There were some words here that were relevant at some point but they aren't anymore and I don't care enough to write something new.

25th July 2014

Photo reblogged from DODGE AND BURN with 111 notes

eastmanhouse:

Self-portrait with laboratory instruments Robert Cornelius, American, 1809 - 1893

December 1843 daguerreotype Image: 8.5 x 7 cm)

eastmanhouse:

Self-portrait with laboratory instruments
Robert Cornelius, American, 1809 - 1893

December 1843
daguerreotype
Image: 8.5 x 7 cm)


24th July 2014

Post reblogged from poops n butts with 100,249 notes

feferiden:

gingerhaze:

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This is the realest shit

This actually happened to me. Still had to do homework. Also, emergency rooms are not quiet, and insurance things require a lot of phone calls.

Source: gingerhaze

14th July 2014

Quote reblogged from Science is Beauty with 745 notes

Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt.

8th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Wanderlust Laced existence with 449,754 notes

consultingangel-of-the-timelord:

#my life in 5 words, 14 letters, and one bracketed action

Source: mccoyly

7th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Scinerds with 1,392 notes

Colonies of Growing Bacteria Make Psychedelic Art

Images: 1) P. vortex exposed to a chemotherapy substance 2) P. vortex 3) Vortex Blue (P. vortex) 4) A close look at P. dendritiformis 5) Bacterial Dragon (Paenibacillus dendritiformis)

Israeli physicist Eshel Ben-Jacob uses bacteria as an art medium, shaping colonies in petri dishes into bold patterns

Source: smithsonianmag.com

7th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Current Biology with 208 notes

currentsinbiology:

How knots can swap positions on a DNA strand
Physicists of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Graduate School of Excellence “Materials Science in Mainz” (MAINZ) have been able with the aid of computer simulations to confirm and explain a mechanism by which two knots on a DNA strand can interchange their positions.




For this, one of the knots grows in size while the other diffuses along the contour of the former. Since there is only a small free energy barrier to swap, a significant number of crossing events have been observed in molecular dynamics simulations, i.e., there is a high probability of such interchange of positions.
"We assume that this swapping of positions on a DNA strand may also happen in living organisms," explained Dr. Peter Virnau of the JGU Institute of Physics, who performed the computer simulation together with his colleagues Benjamin Trefz and Jonathan Siebert.
The scientists expect that the mechanism may play an important role in future technologies such as nanopore sequencing, where long DNA strands are sequenced by being pulled though pores. Long DNA strands of more than 100,000 base pairs have an increasing chance of knots, which is relevant for sequencing.

B. Trefz, J. Siebert, P. Virnau. How molecular knots can pass through each other. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014; 111 (22): 7948 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1319376111
Schematic representation of the swapping event: one of the knots grows in size, while the other diffuses along the contour of the former. Credit: Illustration by Peter Virnau

currentsinbiology:

How knots can swap positions on a DNA strand

Physicists of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Graduate School of Excellence “Materials Science in Mainz” (MAINZ) have been able with the aid of computer simulations to confirm and explain a mechanism by which two knots on a DNA strand can interchange their positions.

For this, one of the knots grows in size while the other diffuses along the contour of the former. Since there is only a small free energy barrier to swap, a significant number of crossing events have been observed in molecular dynamics simulations, i.e., there is a high probability of such interchange of positions.

"We assume that this swapping of positions on a DNA strand may also happen in living organisms," explained Dr. Peter Virnau of the JGU Institute of Physics, who performed the computer simulation together with his colleagues Benjamin Trefz and Jonathan Siebert.

The scientists expect that the mechanism may play an important role in future technologies such as nanopore sequencing, where long DNA strands are sequenced by being pulled though pores. Long DNA strands of more than 100,000 base pairs have an increasing chance of knots, which is relevant for sequencing.

B. Trefz, J. Siebert, P. Virnau. How molecular knots can pass through each other. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014; 111 (22): 7948 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1319376111

Schematic representation of the swapping event: one of the knots grows in size, while the other diffuses along the contour of the former. Credit: Illustration by Peter Virnau

27th June 2014

Question reblogged from Thoughts and Misdemeanors with 4 notes

fri624 said: Ooh, why are you going to Poland? (I'm jealous)

logically-devonian:

Carl, the guy I went to Israel with last summer, inherited a farm there from his recently deceased great aunt. We’re going together to check it out then traveling around Eastern Europe. I just left Kite and Rocket too so the timing worked out. Have you ever been there to visit family?

That sounds like it’s going to be awesome! Have fun, and eat lots of pierogies for me.

Nope, I’ve never been. All of my family was driven out of Poland thanks to the Holocaust so there’s no one to visit, but my dad and I really want to plan a trip there soon. He speaks and understands Polish well enough and I’ve been trying to learn.

22nd June 2014

Photo with 3 notes

Found a nest of baby birds in my front yard the other day.

Found a nest of baby birds in my front yard the other day.

Tagged: photographylook at this adorable tiny dinosaurbaby robins

19th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from Science Shenanigans. with 2,597 notes

wnycradiolab:

The ZEISS Microscopy Flickr page is my new favorite thing.

Source: wnycradiolab

16th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Current Biology with 346 notes

currentsinbiology:

Such cooperation!
ucsdhealthsciences:

Getting Rid of Old MitochondriaSome neurons turn to neighbors to help take out the trash
It’s broadly assumed that cells degrade and recycle their own old or damaged organelles, but researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Kennedy Krieger Institute have discovered that some neurons transfer unwanted mitochondria – the tiny power plants inside cells – to supporting glial cells called astrocytes for disposal. 
The findings, published in the June 17 online Early Edition of PNAS, suggest some basic biology may need revising, but they also have potential implications for improving the understanding and treatment of many neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders.
“It does call into question the conventional assumption that cells necessarily degrade their own organelles. We don’t yet know how generalized this process is throughout the brain, but our work suggests it’s probably widespread,” said Mark H. Ellisman, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Neurosciences, director of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) at UC San Diego and co-senior author of the study with Nicholas Marsh-Armstrong, PhD, in the Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University and the Hugo W. Moser Research Institute at Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore.
Read More

currentsinbiology:

Such cooperation!

ucsdhealthsciences:

Getting Rid of Old Mitochondria
Some neurons turn to neighbors to help take out the trash

It’s broadly assumed that cells degrade and recycle their own old or damaged organelles, but researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Kennedy Krieger Institute have discovered that some neurons transfer unwanted mitochondria – the tiny power plants inside cells – to supporting glial cells called astrocytes for disposal. 

The findings, published in the June 17 online Early Edition of PNAS, suggest some basic biology may need revising, but they also have potential implications for improving the understanding and treatment of many neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders.

“It does call into question the conventional assumption that cells necessarily degrade their own organelles. We don’t yet know how generalized this process is throughout the brain, but our work suggests it’s probably widespread,” said Mark H. Ellisman, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Neurosciences, director of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) at UC San Diego and co-senior author of the study with Nicholas Marsh-Armstrong, PhD, in the Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University and the Hugo W. Moser Research Institute at Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore.

Read More

Source: health.ucsd.edu