I'm Leah. I'm studying molecular genetics at the University of Rochester. Sometimes I take pictures.

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from oh, science! with 105 notes

ohscience:

Transverse optical section through villi of small intestine (900x) 
The villi, little finger-like projections all over the intestine, provide increased surface area which allows for rapid digestion. 
(via Transverse optical section through villi of small intestine | 2-photon | Nikon Small World)

ohscience:

Transverse optical section through villi of small intestine (900x)
The villi, little finger-like projections all over the intestine, provide increased surface area which allows for rapid digestion.
(via Transverse optical section through villi of small intestine | 2-photon | Nikon Small World)

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from "Unique Blog Title Here" with 485,221 notes

xld:

I need a hug or 6 shots of vodka

Source: xld

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from Surlyblog with 6 notes

fab3rge-eg0:

how do people even stand themselves though

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from foto.changyichen.com with 37 notes

foto-changyichen:

Daido Moriyama

foto-changyichen:

Daido Moriyama

15th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Mad. Beautiful. Science. with 2,087 notes

jtotheizzoe:

Best Astrophotography of the Year, as chosen by the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

From both an existential and purely technical/photographic aspect, these shots blow my mind. Check out the full gallery of winners at My Modern Met.

(Top two images by Mark Gee, bottom image by Adam Block)

Bonus: Check out grand prize winner Mark Gee’s breathtaking video of a rising moon and tiny human silhouettes, pointing at it and ooh-ing and ahh-ing and generally marveling at the lunar awesomeness. It’s just … wow.

Source: jtotheizzoe

15th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Science Shenanigans. with 23,671 notes

givemeinternet:

Blood Moon gif stabilized and slowed

givemeinternet:

Blood Moon gif stabilized and slowed

Source: givemeinternet

15th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Current Biology with 103 notes

currentsinbiology:

How size splits cells
One of the scientists who revealed how plants “do maths” can now reveal how cells take measurements of size. Size is important to cells as it determines when they divide.
In a paper published in eLife, Professor Martin Howard from the John Innes Centre and colleagues from the US, Germany and Singapore discovered that cells measure their surface area using a particular protein, cdr2p. The finding challenges a previous model suggesting that another protein called pom1p senses a cell’s length.
"Many cell types have been shown to reach a size threshold before they commit to cell division and this requires that they somehow monitor their own size," says Professor Martin Howard from the John Innes Centre.
"For the first time we can show how cells sense size and what aspect of size they measure, such as volume, length, mass or surface area."
The scientists found that as cells grow, the concentration of the cdr2p protein grows. The cells use cdr2p to probe the surface area over the whole cell. Their experimental findings contest a previously suggested model.
Reference
Fluorescence micrograph showing human cells at various stages of cell division, starting with interphase at the top. During interphase the cell gets bigger and duplicates its DNA. The second cell shows prophase, the stage at which the chromosomes form. The third cell is in metaphase, where all the chromosomes are attached and aligned on the spindle. The fourth cell down shows anaphase, the stage at which the chromosomes separate. The final cell is in telophase, and the newly separated genetic material is encased into two new nuclei. Credit: Matthew Daniels, Wellcome Images.

currentsinbiology:

How size splits cells

One of the scientists who revealed how plants “do maths” can now reveal how cells take measurements of size. Size is important to cells as it determines when they divide.

In a paper published in eLife, Professor Martin Howard from the John Innes Centre and colleagues from the US, Germany and Singapore discovered that cells measure their surface area using a particular protein, cdr2p. The finding challenges a previous model suggesting that another protein called pom1p senses a cell’s length.

"Many cell types have been shown to reach a size threshold before they commit to cell division and this requires that they somehow monitor their own size," says Professor Martin Howard from the John Innes Centre.

"For the first time we can show how cells sense size and what aspect of size they measure, such as volume, length, mass or surface area."

The scientists found that as cells grow, the concentration of the cdr2p protein grows. The cells use cdr2p to probe the surface area over the whole cell. Their experimental findings contest a previously suggested model.

Reference

Fluorescence micrograph showing human cells at various stages of cell division, starting with interphase at the top. During interphase the cell gets bigger and duplicates its DNA. The second cell shows prophase, the stage at which the chromosomes form. The third cell is in metaphase, where all the chromosomes are attached and aligned on the spindle. The fourth cell down shows anaphase, the stage at which the chromosomes separate. The final cell is in telophase, and the newly separated genetic material is encased into two new nuclei.
Credit: Matthew Daniels, Wellcome Images.

12th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Mad. Beautiful. Science. with 12,987 notes

tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.

To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»

(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

Source: tedx

12th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Mad. Beautiful. Science. with 4,174 notes

zerostatereflex:

Microorganisms: “Microscopic Life: The World of the Invisible” 1958 Encyclopaedia Britannica Films

All this beautiful life we never see,

Source: zerostatereflex

10th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from 'murica! with 164,401 notes

Tagged: reblogging again because I giggle like an idiot every time this shows up on my dash

Source: kateordie